Fiddle-Faddle

April 21, 2022

Causerie /cau·​se·​rie / noun

Definition: We use the word “fiddle-faddle” in the English language to describe speech or written words as fluff or nonsensical. Someone describing the conversation of another person as “fiddle-faddle” is describing words and speech they deem to be non-sensible and unimportant. We don’t take “fiddle-faddle” in any form seriously.

Etymology: We find the first use of the word “fiddle-faddle” in the late 15th century, between 1571 and 1577. Etymologists say the word originated as a reduplication of the obsolete word “fiddle,” which originally meant “to trifle.” There is also evidence that fiddle-faddle is based on a contemptuous form of another obsolete word, “fiddle.” The definition of the word “fiddle-faddle” has remained consistent since the late 15th century. We still use the word today in the English language to denote nonsense and meaningless information.

In a Sentence

They filled the article fashion magazine with fiddle-faddle and unrealistic beauty tips.

The annoyed audience believed the unfunny comedian was full of fiddle-faddle.

That sounds like a bunch of fiddle-faddle to me!

Synonym

Baloney, Nonsense

Antonym

Sense, Knowledge

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